Visible Learning, where do you fit in?

I just stumbled across this list that helps a person identify which category they may fit into:

An Activator:
Reciprocal teaching
Feedback
Teaching students self-verbalization
Meta-cognition strategies
Direct Instruction
Mastery learning
Goals – challenging
Frequent/ Effects of testing
Behavioral organizers

Vs.

A Facilitator
Simulations and gaming
Inquiry based teaching
Smaller class sizes
Individualized instruction
Problem-based learning
Different teaching for boys & girls
Web-based learning
Whole Language Reading
Inductive teaching

With reading this list I’d have to say I’m in the middle.  You can read more at the link below (pg.31):

http://www.treasury.govt.nz/publications/media-speeches/guestlectures/pdfs/tgls-hattie.pdf

Hattie, J., (year unknown). Visible Learning, Tomorrow’s Schools, The Mindsets that make the difference in Education, Visible Learning Laboratories University of Auckland

Based on Innovation Education Fellow from Harvard University Dr. Tony Wagner’s, book “The Global Achievement Gap and the National Board of Education of Finland this documentary discusses how Finland has achieved the highest international ranking for their students.
As British Columbia’s BCTF and Provincial Government face off there is a country modeling what the possibilities are for our children if we were to only adopt some of their education models and good sense.
Keep contributors to this success are discussed:
Uniform education regardless of class or social status.
Politicians, principals, teachers and universities understand that their children are our future resource and their brains are worth the investment
One of the most interesting facts for me is that Finland has a very low amount of technology incorporated into their classrooms…. Another thing to ponder.

The Finland Phenomena

So, I have a confession to make, I have had a bad or perhaps terrible experience with video games. I know I’m not alone, dealing with a person that the walking dead has modeled its characters after, a video game zombie for lack of better term is beyond frustrating. While there is a piece of me that will always feel that gaming can be a complete and utter waste of time, I must admit I have discovered there may actually be a purpose for these time sucking simulations as well.

As a result of past experience I have kept as far away from all online games as possible. But now I recognize I may need to step out of my past experience and into a new way of thinking.

I have been investigating Instructional Strategies for my Provincial Instructor Diploma Program and much to my surprise gaming of all things has made its way into the field of practice for many educators and the more I read, the more I am beginning to think there may in fact be a place for games and/or gaming in the classroom.

According to McGonigal (2010) Games have a place in higher education because they create Urgent Optimism, Social Engagement, Blissful Productivity, Epic Meaning: Not only that but they also make the curriculum fun and engaging. To read more on Gamification in the classroom visit: http://www.humber.ca/centreforteachingandlearning/assets/files/Teaching%20Resources/2013_EmergingEdTech_Free-Education-Technology-Resources-eBook.pdf

I would also strongly recommend watching this game changing TED Talk by Jane McGonigal (2010). (forgive the pun, I couldn’t help myself):

An Anti-Gamer turned to “Gamification” believer:

What an inspiring video this is.

Maybe it isn’t about intellect, maybe it isn’t about gaining a deeper understanding of ones-self. Perhaps doing well, not only in school but in life requires something more… maybe that something is perseverance… maybe that something is “grit”. (2013). You truly need to watch the video, it speaks for itself.

http://99u.com/articles/7094/the-future-of-self-improvement-part-i-grit-is-more-important-than-talent

http://changingthegameproject.com/rescue-your-kids-from-affluenza-teach-them-grit/

http://www.forbes.com/sites/margaretperlis/2013/10/29/5-characteristics-of-grit-what-it-is-why-you-need-it-and-do-you-have-it/

“Grit”

Is there value in having a “bad teacher”?

I have been lucky to have had a great teacher at one time, she was my grade 7 teacher.

But my greatest teacher in life (whom I will not name) was also my worst teacher. I know this may sound insane, but allow me to explain.

This teacher never took the time to explain anything, make me feel comfortable or heard in fact she probably unknowingly made me feel quite small at times.

However, through this experience I was taught many things I DO NOT want to emulate as I grew into an adult and professional. It has been a huge part of my learning and growth and has molded me into who I am today.

While I am certainly not perfect I have learned so much of who I don’t want to be from this person that it has helped direct me to be the person I am today, someone I am proud of.  II am left having to consider as I move forward, is it possible that our worst teachers can actually teach us the most?

Forums and learning

It is sometimes hard for me to admit when I am venturing outside of my realm of innate knowledge and practice. There is so much to learn in what feels like so little time, my background is in management and HR, yet teaching has always been what sparks my personal motivation and desire to do and be more.

Self-directed learning, at first glance, is definitely what I have engaged in by taking an online college course while trying to manage my crazy life and yet, while it seems I am only adding to my craziness, I am finding that I am fully immersed in learning theories and application.

Learning about adult education and practice while I am undertaking my new role at work has been challenging, exhausting and downright infuriating when I feel I really should be getting more accomplished than I have. Especially having a one year old, a thirteen year old and a grown up boy child (aka, fun-loving, playful husband) that want a lot of my attention.

However, it is moments like this when I am able to take the time to sit quietly and reflect on the overwhelming amount of information and discussion I have mentally digested that I am able to recognize and appreciate just how much I have grown in understanding adult education and the application in which I can use it in my world at work.

It is for this reason that I have decided it best, for my own learning and organization, to summarize the main points that have resonated with me that relate to each of the forum discussions I have read and been a part of.

Over the next few weeks I will be taking the information I have hoarded, sort through it, organize it and reflect on what each discussion topic means to me. What I have learned and what I would like to take away from the discussions to apply in my practice.

Stay tuned everyone…. There is a mess of thought and reflection about to be shared… ready or not.

Please see the postings under Instructional Strategies – Forum Reflections to see what I have learned from each thread/topic/discussion.

I have done it!

O.k. I know there are a lot of people out there that would laugh at my lack of technical skills however,
I am forcing myself out of my comfort zone and learning to use technology as an aid to teaching, thanks to
a little (or perhaps big) nudge from the Provincial Instructor Diploma Program at VCC. Learning how to
incorporate all of these techniques is frightening and exciting, since I have always loved to acquire knowledge,
as some women collect shoes. 🙂

Every topic I chose in this program helps to build my knowledge and understanding of instructional strategies so
I can incorporate what I am doing into the Training Department I manage. It is for that reason
I chose to do a digital instructional video on Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI). This is something I am aiming to
incorporate in my work place to make learning accessible to everyone (including our shift workers).

I hope you enjoy it!